Why You Should Take A Hike – Part 4  

You Can Learn New Things

WHY:

So why should you take a hike…well my dad always said, “you just might learn something, if you’re not careful”.  We took a hike and did just that! We went to MOAB, Utah to enjoy the adventurous landscape and lifestyle there. We tried an awesome hike up to an oasis in Mill Creek Canyon. This hike has it all: river, waterfall, swimming hole and even petroglyphs. It was filled with all kinds of things to explore. Among our new discoveries were many petroglyphs and a variety of plants. Seeing these new ancient writings and desert vegetation brought up lots of questions. Our curious minds were filled with new ideas, as we hiked together as a family. We also learned how to jump off a cliff!  Ahhhh…

WHAT:

What do you need to know:

  • Hiking time – 1 hour
  • Round trip – 2 miles
  • Elevation gain – 374 feet
  • Hike Difficulty – Easy
  • Restrooms – No
  • Dogs allowed  – Yes
  • Bikes allowed – No

What do you need to bring:

  • Water – we brought lots of water and a little gatorade to keep us hydrated.
  • Water Shoes – were nice for crossing the creek and wading in the water. We like Chaco or Keen style shoes for hiking.
  • Sun Protection – hats, glasses, sunscreen are nice because it gets hot and was mighty sunny too.
  • Swim Suits – if you plan on taking a dip at the swimming hole, then suits are recommended.
  • Curiosity- go ready to explore and keep your eyes open for petroglyphs/pictographs, plants and even wildlife.

HOW:

How to hike and learn something….with your own two feet and eyes too. You can get out there to find the PETROGLYPHS and PICTOGRAPHS.  We saw them right along the trail and some were found off the path on some big boulders. These writings started a conversation about ancient people with our kids.

The photos above show just a few of the DESERT PLANTS we saw. There were several beautiful flowers along the trail. It must have been all the May showers we’ve had this year, bringing late May flowers. The center picture shows snake grass, which is cool, but don’t be fooled there are real snakes out there too.  No lying, we saw a pretty big one, like 4 feet long,  just of the path climb right up into a hole. That was a good lesson for the kids too, BEWARE of SNAKES while hiking! STEP CAREFULLY we saw many CACTUS around the hiking trail.

WHEN:

When to take this hike….we went the last week in May. It was the perfect weather.  It was 80 degrees and clear skies.  It would be okay to go in hot weather too.  Summer hiking would mean hotter temperatures.  At least you can cool off in the creek along the trail and a water hole to swimming in at the end. Fall and spring hiking might mean less time in the cool water. If you go during the busy summer months the earlier in the day the less people you will see. We arrived at the waterfall about 11:00am there were only a couple other people there. The place was packed by noon.

Swimming Hole: There are places for young kids to swim and wade in the water by the waterfall. If you venture up above the waterfall there is even more water fun.  Below is a picture of of my hubby trying to convince my 3 older kids to jump off a cliff, ha! Only our brave 7 year old actually did it! Even, mom and dad showed off our CRAZY cliff jumping skills. Make sure to check the water depth and rocks in the water before jumping. I always say let another crazy jumper go first, then if they survive…take a leap.

WHERE:

Where do you start? Directions -The trailhead is located on the south end of the town of Moab. To get there from southbound U.S. Route 191 (also Moab’s Main Street), turn left on 300 South, then right on 400 East. Turn left onto east Mill Creek Drive. Follow the road as it winds out of town, then turn left on East Powerhouse Lane. There’s a parking lot near the trailhead, which can get crowded on nice days.

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Hiking Series-

Part 1 – Antelope Island, Frary Peak

Part 2 – Zion National Park, Pine Creek Canyon

Part 3 – Great Salt Lake Shoreline Preserve

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